Inky Odds

Inky Odds

Inky Odds

$9.95$12.95

Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite, Eric Sevareid―the greatest American journalists of the 20th century all made their names as war correspondents, but none of them would beat out Bat Conroy to a good story. When it comes to the Japanese invasion of China, Bat’s always been top dog … until now. An unknown writer is stealing his thunder and maybe even his job―and the most shocking news of all is the true identity of the elusive journalist.

Yet another story from L. Ron Hubbard that will amaze you.” ―G.W.

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Edward R. Murrow, Walter Cronkite, Eric Sevareid—the greatest American journalists of the 20th century all made their names on as war correspondents, but none of them would beat out Bat Conroy to a good story. When it comes to the Japanese invasion of China, Bat’s always been top dog… until now. An unknown writer is stealing his thunder and maybe even his job—and the most shocking news of all is the true identity of the elusive journalist.

As a young man, Hubbard visited Manchuria, where his closest friend headed up British intelligence in northern China. Hubbard gained a unique insight into the intelligence operations and spy-craft in the region as well as the hostile political climate between China and Japan—a knowledge that informs stories like Inky Odds.

“Great humor and adventure.” —Yahoo Voices

“Riveting cliff-hanger action.” —Midwest Book Review

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ISBN: 978-1-59212-286-8
Price: $9.95
Format: Trade Paperback
Pages: 128

ISBN: 978-1-59212-163-2
Price: $12.95
Format: Unabridged, Multicast, 2 CDs
Length: Approx. 2 hours
Cast list: Audio drama performed by Jennifer Aspen, R.F. Daley, Lori Jablons, Shane Johnson, Jim Meskimen and Tait Ruppert.

Inky Odds Glossary

The Stories from the Golden Age series reflect the words and expressions used in the 1930s and 1940s, adding unique flavor and authenticity to the tales. While a character’s speech may often reflect regional origins, it also can convey attitudes common in the day. So that readers can better grasp such cultural and historical terms, uncommon words or expressions of the era, the following glossary has been provided.

Australian honey bear: a koala.

binnacle: a built-in housing for a ship’s compass.

blackguard: a man who behaves in a dishonorable or contemptible way.

brass cash: any of various Asian coins of small denomination with a square hole in their center.

bug: a high-speed telegrapher’s key that makes repeated dots or dashes automatically and saves motion of the operator’s hand.

Bund: the word bund means an embankment and “the Bund” refers to a particular stretch of embanked riverfront along the Huangpu River in Shanghai that is lined with dozens of historical buildings. The Bund lies north of the old walled city of Shanghai. This was initially a British settlement; later the British and American settlements were combined into the International Settlement. A building boom at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century led to the Bund becoming a major financial hub of East Asia.

camion: a low flat four-wheeled truck.

carabao: water buffalo.

Changkow: Kaingsu or Jaingsu Province; a province of China, located along the east coast of the country, on the Yellow Sea.

Chiang Kai-shek: (1887–1975); military leader of the Chinese Nationalist Party that attempted to purge Communism from China and unite the country under one central government. Civil war broke out in 1927 between the Nationalist government and the Red Army led by Mao Tse-tung. China was also involved in intermittent conflicts with Japan since 1931, with full-scale war breaking out in 1937. In 1949, the Nationalist government’s power declined and Communist control ensued, forcing the Nationalists from mainland China into Taiwan.

Cochin China: a region covering southern Vietnam. Originally part of the Chinese empire, it was made a French colony in 1867 and combined with other French territories to form French Indochina in 1887 with Saigon as its capital. It was incorporated into Vietnam in 1949.

davits: any of various cranelike devices, used singly or in pairs, for supporting, raising and lowering boats, anchors and cargo over a hatchway or side of a ship.

dazzle-painted: something painted with dazzle camouflage; a camouflage paint scheme of complex geometric shapes in contrasting colors. Its purpose was not concealment but to make it difficult to estimate the target by creating a confusion with rangefinders that operated by lining up two half-images of the target. Dazzle camouflage was intended to make it hard to do this job because the clashing patterns would not look right in the rangefinder sights even when aligned.

dog bites man: the phrase comes from a quote attributed to New York Sun editor John B. Bogart (1845–1921): “When a dog bites a man, that is not news, because it happens so often. But if a man bites a dog, that is news.”

drome: short for airdrome; a military air base.

emplacements: prepared positions for weapons or military equipment.

fo’c’s’le: forecastle; the upper deck of a sailing ship, forward of the foremast.

foredeck: the part of a ship’s deck between the bridge and the forecastle (the upper deck of a sailing ship, forward of the foremast).

Frisco: San Francisco.

Gobi: Asia’s largest desert, located in China and southern Mongolia.

godown: a warehouse; a commercial building for storage of goods.

holdout: playing cards hidden in a gambling game for the purpose of cheating.

jane: a girl or a woman.

Kalgan: a city in northeast China near the Great Wall that served as both a commercial and a military center. Kalgan means “gate in a barrier” or “frontier” in Mongolian. It is the eastern entry into China from Inner Mongolia.

Kawasaki: aircraft named after its manufacturer. Founded in 1918, Kawasaki built engines and biplanes in the 1930s, including fighters and bombers.

key: a hand-operated device used to transmit Morse code messages.

limber: a two-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle used to tow a field gun or an ammunition box.

Mariveles: a town and the mountains located in the southern part of the Bataan Peninsula on Luzon, the chief and largest island of the Philippines.

Mex: Mexican peso; in 1732 it was introduced as a trade coin with China and was so popular that China became one of its principal consumers. Mexico minted and exported pesos to China until 1949. It was issued as both coins and paper money.

Mikado: the emperor of Japan; a title no longer used.

Mindanao: the second largest and easternmost island in the Philippines.